Skip to content
Scroll

A Star For Humanity

Visible with the naked eye, the Humanity Star is a highly reflective satellite that blinks brightly across the night sky to create a shared experience for everyone on the planet.

Created by Rocket Lab founder and CEO Peter Beck, the Humanity Star is a geodesic sphere made from carbon fibre with 76 highly reflective panels. It spins rapidly, reflecting the sun’s rays back to Earth, creating a flashing light that can be seen against a backdrop of stars.

Orbiting the Earth every 90 minutes and visible from anywhere on the globe, the Humanity Star is designed to be a bright symbol and reminder to all on Earth about our fragile place in the universe.

Under One Sky

"For millennia, humans have focused on their terrestrial lives and issues. Seldom do we as a species stop, look to the stars and realize our position in the universe as an achingly tiny speck of dust in the grandness of it all.

Humanity is finite, and we won't be here forever. Yet in the face of this almost inconceivable insignificance, humanity is capable of great and kind things when we recognize we are one species, responsible for the care of each other, and our planet, together. The Humanity Star is to remind us of this.

No matter where you are in the world, rich or in poverty, in conflict or at peace, everyone will be able to see the bright, blinking Humanity Star orbiting Earth in the night sky. My hope is that everyone looking up at the Humanity Star will look past it to the expanse of the universe, feel a connection to our place in it and think a little differently about their lives, actions and what is important.

Wait for when the Humanity Star is overhead and take your loved ones outside to look up and reflect. You may just feel a connection to the more than seven billion other people on this planet we share this ride with." Peter Beck

  • Humanity Star not in shadow
  • Humanity Star in shadow

FAQS

  • How does it work?

    The Humanity Star is a geodesic sphere is made from carbon fibre with 76 highly reflective panels. The sphere spins rapidly, briefly reflecting the sun’s light back to Earth to create a fleeting moment of light.

  • How can I see the Humanity Star?

    You can track the Humanity Star’s location at www.TheHumanityStar.com to find out when it will be overhead and visible in your region. Depending on where the Humanity Star’s is in its orbital path, it may be months before it is clearly visible in your part of the world.

    As the Humanity Star experiences drag from the atmosphere at the lowest point in its orbit, the satellite will slow down creating a slight alteration in the orbital path. For this reason, any predicted pass times more than three days away will only be a general anticipated time, rather than exact viewing times. The farther the anticipated pass time, the less accurate it will be, so check the tracker as the time gets closer for a more accurate calculation. Once a pass is within 24 hours, the accuracy of the Humanity Star’s position will be refined to minutes.

  • How long will it remain in orbit?

    The Humanity Star will orbit the Earth for approximately nine months before its orbit starts to decay and it is pulled back into the Earth’s gravity where it burns up on re-entry leaving no trace in space or on Earth.

  • How big is the Humanity Star?

    The Humanity Star is 1m high (3.2 ft.), and weighs around 10.34 kg (22.7 lbs).

  • Is The Humanity Star visible during the day?

    The Humanity Star is not visible during the day. It is best viewed at dawn or dusk. At that time, for just a few brief seconds, the Humanity Star will be slightly brighter than the stars alongside it - just enough to draw people’s eyes skyward and leave them looking at the night sky long after the satellite has passed.

  • Will the Humanity Star impact my view of the night sky?

    The Humanity Star will create fleeting glint of light across the sky, lasting just a few seconds as it reflects sunlight back to the Earth’s surface. The Humanity Star will be most visible at dawn and dusk, generally just above the horizon. It is designed to briefly catch people’s eyes, drawing their gaze to the stars and universe beyond The Humanity Star, leaving them looking at the night sky long after the satellite has passed.

  • How bright will it be?

    For a brief moment, The Humanity Star will be slightly brighter than the stars alongside it. The light from passing aircraft will be more obvious and significantly more frequent than The Humanity Star.

  • How often can I see the Humanity Star?

    Due to the nature of orbital mechanics, the Humanity Star will only be visible from the same spot on Earth a handful of times in the star’s short, nine-month lifespan.

  • Will you put another Humanity Star up when this one de-orbits?

    No. The Humanity Star is designed to be a one-time, short-term experience. The intention was always to draw more people to the night sky, perhaps those who may not otherwise be looking.

  • Why did you create the Humanity Star?

    The Humanity Star is designed to be a symbol in the night sky that encourages everyone to look up and ponder humanity’s place within the universe.

    It was created to encourage people to look up and past terrestrial life to consider our position as one species on a small planet in a vast universe. It will hopefully encourage conversation about the collective challenges we are all facing that can only be solved by thinking and working as one species. The hope is that as people watch for it they will linger looking at the night sky. The intention was always to draw more people to the night sky, perhaps those who may not otherwise be looking.

Humanity Star 2

Education

Learn about the Humanity Star and build your own with these printable activity sheets.

Media Queries

For more information, images and interview requests, please complete the inquiry form below.